Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Crocheting in the Round - Chain Stitch Method



Crocheting in the Round refers to crocheting something that is circular. This would include items that are hollow like sleeves and flat or semi-flat items like coasters and hats. There are two methods for crocheting circular items. Today we will be discussing Chain Circles

Chain circles: 
A chain circle is where you chain a given number of loops and connect them using a slip stitch. (slip stitch - insert hook, pull loop through and through loop on hook) This method is used when making a sweater, a sleeve for a sweater or other hollow, cylindrical item. There are two approaches to crocheting a chain circle:

Method 1 - crochet starting outside the circle

To make a chain circle, first chain 5 loops as pictures below (5 loops and one on the hook). To connect your ends you would then insert your hook in the first loop of the chain, pull up a loop and pull in through the loop on your hook:





To start your next row you would first chain your turning row. For this example we will be creating rows of sc (single crochet) so chain a single loop to make the turning chain.

Next you will sc (single crochet) in the first stitch but instead of one sc, you will be adding two. This is to ensure that your circle lays flat. In each stitch around, add two single crochets (sc)

When you have added two sc stitches to each stitch around you should have double the number of stitches as you originally chained. You should count and review your stitched at the end of each row to ensure that you have not added or decreased a stitch. To do so will cause there to be a ripple or pucker in your circle. If you do see a pucker later on, you may need to undo your work to fix the problem. BUT you may chose to do it on purpose if you are trying to make something look a certain way. For example, if you are crocheting a skirt and want it to ripple or have waves in it.

When you reach the end you will need to connect the begining and end of the row. To do this, insert your hook in the top of the first sc of this row and pull through a loop, continue to pull through the loop on your hook to make a slip stitch.




The second row is made in the same way, except you will not add two sc to each stitch in round two. To allow the circle to remain flat you will add two sc to the first stitch, one sc to the next, then repeat the pattern all the way around (pattern: 2 sc in first stitch, 1 sc in next - repeat)

For each subsequant round you will increase the number of stitches with one sc so...
Row 3: pattern: 2 sc in first stitch, 1 sc in next two stitches
Row 4: pattern: 2 sc in first stitch, 1 sc in next three stitches


Method 2: Crochet starting inside the circle

First start with your completed loop. Now instead of crocheting in each stitch around, crochet around the loop as pictured:


By doing this you make the center loop more smooth. You will also add many more sc stitches as you are trying to completely cover the original loop. This method is used for decorative items like napkin holders, window hangers and Christmas ornaments.


The next round is the same as before. Each stitch receives two sc.


For each subsequant round you will increase the number of stitches with one sc so...
Row 3: pattern: 2 sc in first stitch, 1 sc in next two stitches
Row 4: pattern: 2 sc in first stitch, 1 sc in next three stitches

If you happen to try this pattern - post a picture of your work on my Facebook site: http://www.facebook.com/pages/CrochetByKarin/134647016599101
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...